Day 1
THE HOLY SPIRIT IS GOD
I BEGIN WITH THIS stunning truth because it is the most important thing that can be said about the Holy
Spirit: that He is God. Fully God. The Holy Spirit is fully God as the Father is God and as Jesus the
Son is God. We know that the Father is God; this is an assumption we accept uncritically—like
saying God is God. And as Christians we equally believe and confess that Jesus is God. “In the
beginning was the Word, and the Word was with God, and the Word was God” (John 1:1). The Word
was made flesh (v. 14) and yet remained fully God. Jesus was (and is) God as though He were not
man, and yet man as though He were not God. God Himself calls Jesus God, for He said to the Son,
“Your throne, O God, will last for ever and ever” (Heb. 1:8). As John summed up his general epistle:
Jesus Christ “is the true God” (1 John 5:20).
Therefore in the exact same way the Holy Spirit is truly, totally, and fully God—as God is God.
When Ananias lied to the Holy Spirit, he lied to God. Peter said to him, “How is it that Satan has
so filled your heart that you have lied to the Holy Spirit? . . . You have not lied to men but to God”
(Acts 5:3–4). As a consequence Ananias (and afterward his wife, Sapphira) were immediately struck
dead. The Holy Spirit was present in the earliest church at a very high level. They were in a “revival
situation,” which is something the church sadly is not experiencing at the moment. So when God is
manifest as powerfully as He was at that time, it became dangerous to lie in His presence. Lying to
the Holy Spirit was like tampering with high-voltage electricity with wet hands.
Paul also demonstrated the deity of the Holy Spirit when he said we are God’s “temple.” The
temple is the place where God Himself dwells. “If anyone destroys God’s temple, God will destroy
him” (1 Cor. 3:16). Moreover, “Your body is a temple of the Holy Spirit, who is in you, whom you
have received from God” (1 Cor. 6:19). This is another way of stating that the Holy Spirit is God.
Paul also said, “The Lord is the Spirit” (2 Cor. 3:17).
We must therefore speak of the deity of the Holy Spirit—that He is God—because He is. We don’t
feel a need to speak of the deity of the Father, do we? It would seem redundant. And yet sometimes I
think I would like to preach on the Godhood of God! The most neglected member of the Trinity these
days is God the Father. There are more books written by Christian authors on Jesus and on the Holy
Spirit than on God the Father.
That said, never underestimate or take for granted the deity of the Holy Spirit. The Holy Spirit in
you is God in you. You can worship the Holy Spirit; you can pray to the Holy Spirit; you can sing to
the Holy Spirit. And yet there are some sincere Christians who are reluctant to pray or sing to the
Holy Spirit. This is because of a faulty translation of John 16:13, which I will examine below. Such
well-meaning Christians don’t mind singing the first two verses of a well-known chorus that speaks
of glorifying the Father and the Son, but when it comes to glorifying the Spirit, some are afraid to
continue singing! As if the Spirit does not want to be worshipped and adored! Or as if the Father and
the Son would not want this!
Such Christians feel uncomfortable singing about worshipping and adoring the Spirit because the
King James Version translated John 16:13—referring to the Holy Spirit—“He shall not speak of
himself,” a verse that should be translated, “He will not speak on His own,” as I show again later in
this book. I actually sympathize with these people, however. I know where they are coming from. I
used to have the same problem until I saw what the Greek literally said. And yet traditional church
hymnals for many years have unashamedly included hymns with lyrics such as “Holy Spirit, Truth
divine, dawn upon this soul of mine,”1 “Holy Ghost dispel our sadness,”2 “Lord God, the Holy Ghost,
in this accepted hour, as on the day of Pentecost, descend in all Thy power,”3 or “Spirit of God,
descend upon my heart.”4 I love the words of the following hymn:
I worship Thee, O Holy Ghost,
I love to worship Thee;
My risen Lord for aye were lost
But for Thy company.
I worship Thee, O Holy Ghost,
I love to worship Thee;
With Thee each day is Pentecost,
Each night Nativity.5
You could not address the Holy Spirit like that if He were not God. Do not be afraid to talk
directly to the Holy Spirit. Or to sing to Him. There is no jealousy or rivalry in the Trinity—the
Father and Son and Holy Spirit. The Father is happy and the Son is happy when you address the Holy
Spirit in prayer. After all, the Spirit of God is God the Spirit. What is more, the Trinity is not God the
Father, God the Son, and God the Holy Bible! Let this grip you.
Never forget, then: the Holy Spirit is God. Therefore think about this: you may be filled with God. I
want to be passionate about God. Consider all the attributes of God. “The heavens declare the glory
of God; the skies proclaim the work of his hands” (Ps. 19:1). “When I consider your heavens, the
work of your fingers, the moon and the stars, which you have set in place, what is man that you are
mindful of him?” (Ps. 8:3–4). Ponder this: God your Creator and Redeemer is in you! You may be
filled with Him. And this happens because you may be filled with the Holy Spirit—who is God.
For further study: Acts 5:1–13; 1 Corinthians 3:16–17; 1 Corinthians 6:19–20; 2 Corinthians 3:12–18
Come, Holy Spirit, come. Come as wind. Come as fire. That we might be filled,
empowered, and cleansed. In Jesus’s name, amen.


Day 2
THE HOLY SPIRIT IS A PERSON
THE SECOND MOST important truth about the Holy Spirit is that He is a person in the Godhead. Jesus
told us to baptize in “the name of the Father and of the Son and of the Holy Spirit” (Matt. 28:19). Paul
closed one of his letters with this benediction: “May the grace of the Lord Jesus Christ, and the love
of God, and the fellowship of the Holy Spirit be with you all” (2 Cor. 13:14). Peter began his first
letter with the words “chosen according to the foreknowledge of God the Father, through the
sanctifying work of the Spirit, for obedience to Jesus Christ and sprinkling by his blood” (1 Pet. 1:2).
In the early second century Tertullian (c. 160–c. 225) coined a phrase in Latin—trinitas, from
which we get the word trinity. He also referred to the Father, Son, and Holy Spirit as personas—
after which the church referred to the persons of the Godhead. The doctrine of the Trinity has been
orthodox teaching for the Christian church for two thousand years. Don’t try to figure out this
teaching! Just believe it. You don’t try to figure out electricity; you just use it. The Trinity is given to
us not to understand fully but fully to believe.
Therefore Trinity is a word that does not attempt to explain but merely to identify the persons in the
Godhead. That said, the Father and the Son are each seen as “He.” The Holy Spirit is also to be
understood as “He.” It is sad that the King James Version referred to the Holy Spirit as “it” in
Romans 8:26—“the Spirit itself.” Modern versions have corrected this, translating the Greek “the
Spirit himself.”
Jesus referred to the Holy Spirit as “he” (John 14:16; 16:8) and introduced Him as allon
parakletos—the literal Greek translation being “another one [allon] who comes alongside
[parakletos].” It is impossible to translate parakletos with one word, though it has been variously
translated as “comforter,” “advocate,” “counselor,” or “helper.” All these describe exactly what
Jesus was; He was a person who had come alongside the Twelve for some three years. The disciples
knew Jesus at a natural level. They knew what He looked like; they knew the color of His eyes, the
sound of His voice. He had been physically real to them for those three years; they saw Him, heard
Him, and touched Him (1 John 1:1). Jesus was a real person.
Although invisible to us, the Holy Spirit likewise is a real person.
Therefore never think of the Holy Spirit as an “it,” an “attitude,” or an “influence.” He is a person
and has very definite ways. Call those ways peculiar, eccentric, or unique if you like; He has His
ways. You may not like His ways. But get over it! He is the only Holy Spirit you have! He won’t
adjust to you; you must adjust to Him.
The Holy Spirit Himself spoke of ancient Israel as not knowing God’s “ways” (Heb. 3:7–10). God
was grieved because His own covenant people did not know His ways. They should have known
them. But they didn’t. God has His own “ways” and wants us to know them. And so too it is when it
comes to the person of the Holy Spirit. He wants us to know His ways. As we will see below, the
Spirit can be grieved, He can be quenched, and He can be blasphemed.
The Holy Spirit can also have joy. In Romans 14:17 Paul talked about “joy in the Holy Spirit”
(emphasis added), whereas he referred to the “joy of the Holy Spirit” in 1 Thessalonians 1:6 (ESV,
emphasis added). It is His own joy. This joy is not necessarily what we feel; it is what He feels. And
yet sometimes He invites us to feel what He feels! It is called “gladness” in Acts 2:28 (ESV). That is
exactly what I experienced years ago driving in my car, an event to which I will return later.
We need therefore to learn the difference between feeling happy because of circumstances and
feeling the very “joy of the LORD” (Neh. 8:10). There is certainly nothing wrong with our feeling
happy because things are working out for us. Indeed, there was “great joy in that city” when many
who had been paralyzed were healed (Acts 8:7–8). The good news about Gentiles being converted
made the disciples “very glad” (Acts 15:3). But the highest level of joy on this planet is when we are
allowed to experience the very joy of the Spirit—feeling what He feels. Peter pointed out that his
readers had not seen Jesus Himself but that they nonetheless experienced Him. “Though you have not
seen him, you love him; and even though you do not see him now, you believe in him and are filled
with an expressible and glorious joy” (1 Pet. 1:8). For when the person of the Holy Spirit lets us feel
His joy, it is truly “inexpressible.”
For further study: Nehemiah 8:10; John 14:16–21; 1 Corinthians 12:4–6; Ephesians 4:4–6; Hebrews
3:7–11; Jude 20–21
Holy Spirit, I welcome You afresh into my heart. Let me experience Your person and
Your joy in ever-increasing measure. In Jesus’s name, amen.__Day 2
THE HOLY SPIRIT IS A PERSON
THE SECOND MOST important truth about the Holy Spirit is that He is a person in the Godhead. Jesus
told us to baptize in “the name of the Father and of the Son and of the Holy Spirit” (Matt. 28:19). Paul
closed one of his letters with this benediction: “May the grace of the Lord Jesus Christ, and the love
of God, and the fellowship of the Holy Spirit be with you all” (2 Cor. 13:14). Peter began his first
letter with the words “chosen according to the foreknowledge of God the Father, through the
sanctifying work of the Spirit, for obedience to Jesus Christ and sprinkling by his blood” (1 Pet. 1:2).
In the early second century Tertullian (c. 160–c. 225) coined a phrase in Latin—trinitas, from
which we get the word trinity. He also referred to the Father, Son, and Holy Spirit as personas—
after which the church referred to the persons of the Godhead. The doctrine of the Trinity has been
orthodox teaching for the Christian church for two thousand years. Don’t try to figure out this
teaching! Just believe it. You don’t try to figure out electricity; you just use it. The Trinity is given to
us not to understand fully but fully to believe.
Therefore Trinity is a word that does not attempt to explain but merely to identify the persons in the
Godhead. That said, the Father and the Son are each seen as “He.” The Holy Spirit is also to be
understood as “He.” It is sad that the King James Version referred to the Holy Spirit as “it” in
Romans 8:26—“the Spirit itself.” Modern versions have corrected this, translating the Greek “the
Spirit himself.”
Jesus referred to the Holy Spirit as “he” (John 14:16; 16:8) and introduced Him as allon
parakletos—the literal Greek translation being “another one [allon] who comes alongside
[parakletos].” It is impossible to translate parakletos with one word, though it has been variously
translated as “comforter,” “advocate,” “counselor,” or “helper.” All these describe exactly what
Jesus was; He was a person who had come alongside the Twelve for some three years. The disciples
knew Jesus at a natural level. They knew what He looked like; they knew the color of His eyes, the
sound of His voice. He had been physically real to them for those three years; they saw Him, heard
Him, and touched Him (1 John 1:1). Jesus was a real person.
Although invisible to us, the Holy Spirit likewise is a real person.
Therefore never think of the Holy Spirit as an “it,” an “attitude,” or an “influence.” He is a person
and has very definite ways. Call those ways peculiar, eccentric, or unique if you like; He has His
ways. You may not like His ways. But get over it! He is the only Holy Spirit you have! He won’t
adjust to you; you must adjust to Him.
The Holy Spirit Himself spoke of ancient Israel as not knowing God’s “ways” (Heb. 3:7–10). God
was grieved because His own covenant people did not know His ways. They should have known
them. But they didn’t. God has His own “ways” and wants us to know them. And so too it is when it
comes to the person of the Holy Spirit. He wants us to know His ways. As we will see below, the
Spirit can be grieved, He can be quenched, and He can be blasphemed.
The Holy Spirit can also have joy. In Romans 14:17 Paul talked about “joy in the Holy Spirit”
(emphasis added), whereas he referred to the “joy of the Holy Spirit” in 1 Thessalonians 1:6 (ESV,
emphasis added). It is His own joy. This joy is not necessarily what we feel; it is what He feels. And
yet sometimes He invites us to feel what He feels! It is called “gladness” in Acts 2:28 (ESV). That is
exactly what I experienced years ago driving in my car, an event to which I will return later.
We need therefore to learn the difference between feeling happy because of circumstances and
feeling the very “joy of the LORD” (Neh. 8:10). There is certainly nothing wrong with our feeling
happy because things are working out for us. Indeed, there was “great joy in that city” when many
who had been paralyzed were healed (Acts 8:7–8). The good news about Gentiles being converted
made the disciples “very glad” (Acts 15:3). But the highest level of joy on this planet is when we are
allowed to experience the very joy of the Spirit—feeling what He feels. Peter pointed out that his
readers had not seen Jesus Himself but that they nonetheless experienced Him. “Though you have not
seen him, you love him; and even though you do not see him now, you believe in him and are filled
with an expressible and glorious joy” (1 Pet. 1:8). For when the person of the Holy Spirit lets us feel
His joy, it is truly “inexpressible.”
For further study: Nehemiah 8:10; John 14:16–21; 1 Corinthians 12:4–6; Ephesians 4:4–6; Hebrews
3:7–11; Jude 20–21
Holy Spirit, I welcome You afresh into my heart. Let me experience Your person and
Your joy in ever-increasing measure. In Jesus’s name, amen.__


Day 3
THE HOLY SPIRIT IS ETERNAL
WHO MADE GOD?” is the question we all cannot help but ask. I remember asking my mother this
question when I was a child. I wasn’t happy with her answer: “Nobody made God; He always was.”
The reason we aren’t happy with the answer is that we prefer to think logically. Logic often seeks to
remove the need for faith. What makes faith faith is that we simply accept that God always was and
had no beginning. Faith is the assurance of things hoped for but without tangible evidence (Heb.
11:1). There are basically two worldviews when it comes to faith: (1) the secular atheist view: “I
will believe it when I see it,” or seeing is believing; and (2) the biblical view: believing God without
seeing the proof. The Bible makes no attempt to prove the existence of God. The word of God begins,
simply, “In the beginning God created the heavens and the earth” (Gen. 1:1).
So it is with the eternal existence of God. I choose to believe the Bible—the infallible word of
God. I happen to believe totally that the Bible is true. This is because of the inner testimony of the
Holy Spirit. The Holy Spirit has persuaded me that the Bible is true. The Bible says that God is
eternal: “The eternal God is your refuge, and underneath are the everlasting arms” (Deut. 33:27). The
apostle John had a vision of the living creatures in heaven that worship God day and night:
Holy, holy, holy is the Lord God Almighty, who was, and is, and is to come.
—REVELATION 4:8
And so the Holy Spirit—like the Father and the Son—is eternal. This means none of the persons of
the Trinity had a beginning. There is a subtle but important distinction between eternal and
everlasting. Eternal means no beginning as well as no end. Everlasting means no end. For example,
the angels are everlasting but not eternal; they had a beginning because they were created. Both the
Father and the Son are eternal—no beginning, no end. The Word—Jesus—was in the beginning with
God (John 1:2). Paul wrote, “For by him all things were created: things in heaven and on earth,
visible and invisible, whether thrones or powers or rulers or authorities; all things were created by
him and for him. He is before all things, and in him all things hold together” (Col. 1:16–17).
Like the Father and the Son, then, the Holy Spirit is not only everlasting but also eternal; He had no
beginning—because He is God. “How much more, then, will the blood of Christ, who through the
eternal Spirit offered himself unblemished to God, cleanse our consciences from acts that lead to
death, so that we may serve the living God!” (Heb. 9:14, emphasis added). The Father, the Son, and
the Spirit existed in eternity before God chose to create the heavens and the earth (Gen. 1:1). “Before
the mountains were born or you brought forth the whole world, from everlasting to everlasting you are
God” (Ps. 90:2). As I stated above, God the Father is eternal, and so is the Holy Spirit. When Paul
said that in the fullness of time God “sent his Son” (Gal. 4:4), it is because the Father already had a
Son. Jesus Christ is the eternal Son. He was the Word until the moment He became “flesh” (John
1:14). After then He could be called the God-man. The Lord Jesus Christ did not begin in Bethlehem
but at His conception in Nazareth the moment the Word entered the womb of the Virgin Mary.
The Holy Spirit is equally eternal with the Father and the Word. This is the same Holy Spirit that is
mentioned many times in the Old Testament; indeed, the same eternal person Jesus talked about and
introduced to His disciples—not that the Twelve grasped that the Holy Spirit was eternal when He
was first introduced to them. So much of what Jesus taught was not understood for a good while. They
did not even know—at the time—that Jesus was eternal! This was a truth that they took on board little
by little after Jesus ascended to heaven.
As we will see again below, Jesus said that the Holy Spirit spoke through David in Psalm 110:1
(Matt. 22:43). It was the testimony of the early church that God spoke “by the Holy Spirit through the
mouth of your servant, our father David” (Acts 4:25). Indeed, the Holy Spirit had a role in Creation
and was the Author of all Scripture.
In a word: the Holy Spirit is eternal just like the Father and the Son.
For further study: Genesis 1:1–3; Psalm 90; 139; John 1:1–14; 1 Corinthians 2:10–16
Eternal Spirit, I am so honored to know You live in me. To think You have always been
and always will be overwhelms me. I worship You and ask You to rule my whole life. In
Jesus’s name, amen.